Military Watches of the World: Great Britain Part 1

Military Watches of the World: Great Britain Part 1

Postby koimaster » May 22nd 2018, 9:18am

The Boer War, The “Wristlet,” and The Great War

Prior to the 20th century, the “wristlet,” or a small clock worn as a pendant on a bracelet, was almost exclusively worn by women, as men thought them feminine and unreliable. However, accounts from the Second Boer War (1899-1902) describe soldiers jury-rigging pocket watches by soldering on wire lugs and attaching leather straps to them for use on the wrist, which freed the hands for the more necessary tasks of both inflicting and avoiding death.

http://wornandwound.com/military-watche ... world-war/

http://wornandwound.com/military-watche ... m-war-era/




I will be uploading a pdf of these articles as soon as part 3 is posted at the site.
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Re: Military Watches of the World: Great Britain Part 1

Postby conjurer » May 22nd 2018, 9:28am

Interestingly, I didn't find this article Boering.
I checked you out, and I now want you to take the journey to lick my taint. It's small, but vast.


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Re: Military Watches of the World: Great Britain Part 1

Postby JAS1125 » May 22nd 2018, 9:33am

conjurer wrote:Interestingly, I didn't find this article Boering.


Hey Conj, there's a Smith's in the second article :D
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Re: Military Watches of the World: Great Britain Part 1

Postby foghorn » May 22nd 2018, 9:38am

JAS1125 wrote:
conjurer wrote:Interestingly, I didn't find this article Boering.


Hey Conj, there's a Smith's in the second article :D





Yeah, there is!! Dammit JAS-you beat me!!


Here's a picture of that iconic watch that was a portend of the excellence to follow.



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Re: Military Watches of the World: Great Britain Part 1

Postby conjurer » May 22nd 2018, 9:45am

Leftenant: Sarn't Major, when do we start our barrage on the Jerrys?

Sarn't Major: Dunno, sir. Me bloody Smiths watch has stopped. Gone wrong, it has. Bloody Christ! Now it's running backwards!

Leftenant: We're fucking doomed!!
I checked you out, and I now want you to take the journey to lick my taint. It's small, but vast.


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Re: Military Watches of the World: Great Britain Part 1

Postby bobbee » May 22nd 2018, 10:00am

Good article, apart from being 20 years out with the Boer War.
Here is one I cound from 1888, staff of the 1st Brigade of the Hazara Field Force, commanded by Colonel Sym of 5th Gurkhas.
I found this photo four years ago and posted it on WUSb maybe posted it here last year.




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Here is another from 1879.


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I researched the above, and discovered two more pics of the gent wearing a watch.
In the picture below, we see him appearing again, still wearing his black armband, but this time in dress uniform. This pic is circa 1878-1880 too.




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Now, in this 1878 photograph (third from the right) he appears without the armband.




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We can see from the names he is none other than Captain F. Battye, brother of Wigram Battye (far left).

Wigram was killed in 1879 at Futtehabad. Lieutenant Hamilton (far right) won a V.C. at the same battle, trying to rescue Wigram Battye. (He later died at Kabul)



Info on the above photo



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This explains why we see Captain Battye wearing a black armband in the two pictures above. It is a mark of respect for his own brother's death.

Sadly, Captain (later Lieutenant-Colonel) Frederick Battye died in battle in 1895, more below.

The Battye family are well-known warriors, here is more info.

https://wiki.fibis.org/index.php/The_Fighting_Battye

More on Captain Frederick Battye, who died in 1895 fighting for Queen and Country.

http://www.archive.org/stream/frontiero ... 8/mode/1up

Lieutenant Frederick Drummond Battye - Corps of Guides Infantry - Killed in action at Panjkora River 13th April 1895.
The 10th and youngest son of George Wynyard Battye (Bengal Civil Service). Born at Chapra, Bihar 27th May 1847. Served in Jowaki (medal and clasp), Afghanistan 1879-80 (medal and 2 clasps), Hazara 1891 (clasp) and Chitral 1895. On 13th April 1895 the Guides were isolated on a bank of the river Panjkora and attacked, during which Battye was killed.
Grave in Mardan - "Sacred to the memory of Frederick Drummond Battye Lieutenant-Colonel of the 'Queen's Own' Corps of Guides. Born 27th May 1847 Killed in action near Salo on the Panjkora River while gallantly leading the Infantry of his regiment during the advance on Chitral 13th April 1895. He died a noble death leaving behind him the reputation of being a valiant and skilful soldier; a devoted friend; and under all circumstances faithful unto death."
Tablet in St. Alban's Church, Mardan - "To the memory of Lieut-Colonel Frederick Drummond Battye 2nd in command, Infantry, and Offg. Commandant, 'Queen's Own' Corps of Guides, who was killed while conducting with the utmost gallantry and skill, a retirement of the infantry of the corps before very superior numbers of the enemy, near Sado, on the Panjkora River on April 13th 1895."
Memorial at St. Leonards Church, Chelsea, London - "Lieut-Colonel Frederick Drummond Battye, 2nd in command Infantry and Commandant of Guides, who was killed while conducting with the utmost gallantry and skill a retirement of the infantry of the corps before very superior numbers of the enemy, near Sado, on the Panjkora River on April 13th 1895. This tablet and window above it are erected by brother officers and friends."
Last edited by bobbee on May 22nd 2018, 10:27am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Military Watches of the World: Great Britain Part 1

Postby conjurer » May 22nd 2018, 10:10am

bobbee wrote:Good article, apart from being 20 years out with the Boer War.
Here is one I cound from 1888, staff of the 1st Brigade of the Hazara Field Force, commanded by Colonel Sym of 5th Gurkhas.
I found this photo four years ago and posted it on WUSb maybe posted it here last year.




Image


Those look like a bunch of badass motherfuckers.
I checked you out, and I now want you to take the journey to lick my taint. It's small, but vast.


--Temerity, to Mr. Neckbeard.
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Re: Military Watches of the World: Great Britain Part 1

Postby foghorn » May 22nd 2018, 10:18am

Was that taken in front of the 7-11??
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Re: Military Watches of the World: Great Britain Part 1

Postby bobbee » May 22nd 2018, 10:33am

Sorry, I edited my last post above to include more pics and info.

Conj, look at the new pics and see what these badass motherfuckers were like as a family!
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