The end of the “regular” retailer

The end of the “regular” retailer

Postby koimaster » May 18th 2018, 8:16am

It looks like a number of small-but-innovative concept stores, run by genuine “curators”, have a rosy future ahead of them. However, retailers content with setting up shopsin- shops and ending up more like estate agents than watch professionals, have more to worry about...

Dozens upon dozens of watchmaking stores, all lined up, one after the other, all virtually identical... Where might you be? Anywhere in the world! You could be in the Rue du Rhône in Geneva, Zurich’s Bahnhofstrasse, almost any street in downtown Hong Kong, the Dubai Mall, Miami’s Design District, or even Macao’s luxury goods emporia.


According to Bain, between now and 2025, around 75% of purchases will be made in real stores, and roughly 25% in virtual stores.

Is this the future of watchmaking? To a certain extent, yes, but increasingly less so... E-commerce will change the situation, given the masses of watchmaking brands having opened own-name stores over the last “golden” decade. There will always be the need to hit the shops, but a little less so in future (according to Bain, between now and 2025, around 75% of purchases will be made in real stores, and roughly 25% in virtual stores).

https://www.europastar.com/time-busines ... ailer.html
Image

1946-2006

“Your heart was warm and happy

With the lilt of Irish laughter

Every day and in every way

Now forever and ever after."
User avatar
koimaster
Administrator/Founder
 
Posts: 35706
Joined: December 16th 2009, 11:00pm
Location: Oregon

Re: The end of the “regular” retailer

Postby TemerityB » May 18th 2018, 8:19am

I look at the number of watch companies that are already using sites like Amazon and Chrono24 as authorized dealers, and there's no question that things are going digital. Like or not, but it's the way of the world.
Proof that quartz is still not only viable, but sometimes, something to covet: Grand Seiko.
User avatar
TemerityB
ASSHAT
 
Posts: 14599
Joined: June 12th 2010, 10:00pm
Location: New York City

Re: The end of the “regular” retailer

Postby koimaster » May 18th 2018, 9:17am

TemerityB wrote:I look at the number of watch companies that are already using sites like Amazon and Chrono24 as authorized dealers, and there's no question that things are going digital. Like or not, but it's the way of the world.




Maybe but before I purchase a watch on-line I have tried one out in real time to see if it fits well and to confirm I actually would wear it rather than keep it in a watch box. Case in point, when Mark showed off his new Hamilton day/date in blue I purchased one. But besides the photos Mark displayed I went to a dealer to look at one before going to Jomashop to purchase mine.
Image

1946-2006

“Your heart was warm and happy

With the lilt of Irish laughter

Every day and in every way

Now forever and ever after."
User avatar
koimaster
Administrator/Founder
 
Posts: 35706
Joined: December 16th 2009, 11:00pm
Location: Oregon

Re: The end of the “regular” retailer

Postby TemerityB » May 18th 2018, 4:27pm

koimaster wrote:
TemerityB wrote:I look at the number of watch companies that are already using sites like Amazon and Chrono24 as authorized dealers, and there's no question that things are going digital. Like or not, but it's the way of the world.




Maybe but before I purchase a watch on-line I have tried one out in real time to see if it fits well and to confirm I actually would wear it rather than keep it in a watch box. Case in point, when Mark showed off his new Hamilton day/date in blue I purchased one. But besides the photos Mark displayed I went to a dealer to look at one before going to Jomashop to purchase mine.


And what you've expressed is similar to what I used to go through as a musician. I can't imagine buying, say, a guitar, and a good one, online. It's something you need to hear, see, touch, see how it feels, and it's similar to a watch buying experience. I used to tell my bands, I don't care what it costs, I'm buying stuff at music stores, since New York City had so many of them ... particularly on 48th Street ...

Until the web and the end of the "rock band" came along. The legendary music stores - Manny's Music, Sam Ash, Alex Instruments, and most of the others - they're all gone, vanished. I still can't believe it. I loved that neighborhood and I used to get off buying my gear at the same place many of my favorite buddies got theirs.

But I agree with you - I tend to like to see, check out, inspect before I buy a watch. I still prefer brick and mortar to any other way of buying a watch - I won't spend more than $500 online, that's a hard and fast rule - even if virtually everyone on every site thinks I'm nuts. Yet, I knew when Kenjo shuttered, it was the start of a trend.
Proof that quartz is still not only viable, but sometimes, something to covet: Grand Seiko.
User avatar
TemerityB
ASSHAT
 
Posts: 14599
Joined: June 12th 2010, 10:00pm
Location: New York City


Return to General Watch talk

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests